Posts Tagged With: Biscuits

Enchilada Pull-Aparts

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The first time I made these, I accidentally used diced jalapenos instead of diced green chilies. They were just a wee bit spicy, but we still really liked them. In addition to being hot and tasty, these go together in a snap and take only 30 minutes to bake. You can easily have dinner on the picnic table in under an hour. Serve with sour cream, guacamole, and a salad, and you have a great meal.

This is also a dish that you can easily customize. I did, without even intending to, when I swapped the diced green chilies for diced jalapenos. You could swap the red enchilada sauce for green or swap the ground beef for chicken. You could add black beans, diced tomatoes, or some corn. Whatever floats your boat. Have some fun and make it your own. I’ll bet it becomes a family favorite.

Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven or 9×13 baking dish.

Ingredients
1 package of refrigerated biscuit dough
10 ounces enchilada sauce (we like to use red)
1 pound ground beef
1 packet taco seasoning or use your own mix
4 ounce can diced green chilies or diced jalapenos
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1 cup grated pepper jack or Monterey jack cheese

Prep

On a propane stove or over coals, in a Dutch oven, brown the ground beef. Drain the grease and stir in the taco seasoning and 2 tablespoons of water. Stir in the diced green chilies or jalapenos. Remove from heat and set aside. Start your coals.

Open the biscuits and slice each biscuit into 8 small pieces. Add the biscuits and enchilada sauce to the Dutch oven and lightly mix everything together like tossing a salad. Sprinkle the cheese evenly over the top.

Bake in a 350°F oven, using 17 coals on the lid and 8 underneath, for 30 minutes or until the biscuits are cooked through and the cheese is fully melted. You could also load this into a 9×13 baking pan and bake it in a box oven, using about 14 coals.

Top with cilantro, avocado or guacamole, sour cream, hot sauce, etc.

Serves about 8

This post has been shared at Homestead Bloggers Network. If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, subscribe to Chuck Wagoneer by clicking on the Follow Us button in the upper right corner and follow us on Facebook and Pinterest for the latest updates and more stuff!

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Categories: Box Oven, Dutch Oven, Main Dishes, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Celebrating 2016

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We now have 117 posts, more than 1,400 followers, and nearly 22,000 page views. Wow!

I want to thank all my guinea pigs, I mean, family, friends, and scouts who taste tested every recipe I blogged about, and for all your comments and suggestions for blog ideas.

Let’s celebrate 2016 and look back at the 10 posts you gave the most “hits” to this year.

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  1. Best Ever Meatloaf

Now, I know what you’re thinking: Ugh! Meatloaf! Really?! I have to admit, I’ve had some really lousy meatloaves over the years. I have an aunt, who shall remain nameless, who frequently made meatloaf when we came to visit and, I swear, it was like eating sawdust! But have no fear, meatloaf phobes, this meatloaf recipe is a winner! It even won over my meatloaf-hating hubby many years ago. Read the post.

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  1. Scalloped Potatoes are the Mother of All Comfort Foods

Scalloped potatoes are one of my family’s favorite winter comfort foods. They pair very nicely with my meatloaf. They both cook at the same temperature. The potatoes go into the oven first because they cook 90 minutes and then I assemble the meatloaf and it goes into the oven for an hour. I time it so they are done at the same time. I serve them together with either a green vegetable or a salad. It’s heaven on a plate! Read the post.

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  1. Apple Raisin Monkey Bread

I think this just became my new favorite monkey bread! A couple weeks ago, we were going to a potluck brunch with friends and we wanted to make monkey bread. On a lark, we decided to add a diced apple and it was amazing! We loved it! Read the post.

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  1. Meatball Sub Pull-Aparts

Let me just say right up front, this is crazy good! Okay, now that we have that out of the way, we can continue. This is a warm, hearty meal that tastes amazing. From the rich and flavorful Italian meatballs and marinara sauce to the velvety, gooey mozzarella cheese to the fluffy and crunchy bits of French bread, this was so yummy! Serve it with a fresh green Italian or Caesar salad and you have a winner dinner. Everyone loved this. Read the post.

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  1. Chicken Mini Pies

This has to be one of our family’s top 10 favorite things to eat. We don’t make them very often because they are a bit labor intensive, but they are well worth the effort. In fact, they taste so yummy that we nearly devour them as soon as they come out of the oven, piping hot and scalding our mouths in the process. But we just can’t stop ourselves. They are that yummy. Read the post.

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  1. White Bean Chicken Chili

I have to admit that I was a little concerned at first when I saw and smelled the amount of cilantro that goes in because I’m not a big cilantro fan. But after simmering 30 minutes, the cilantro really mellows out and provides the signature flavor of this dish. I’m not sure what it is about white beans, but for me, they are a comfort food. This is such a satisfying soup but it is also light so it’s perfect for a cold winter or warm summer night. When I made this a couple weekends later, I served it with my cornbread. Read the post.

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  1. DIY: How to Build a Box Oven

A box oven is a cheap and easy way to add an oven to your outdoor cooking gear. They are simple to make and you can build as many as you want. If a Dutch oven is out of your budget, a box oven is definitely in your budget and they are so simple to make a Brownie or Cub Scout could build one. Even if you have one or more Dutch ovens, one or two box ovens can add that much more oven power to your camp kitchen. Here’s all you need to build a box oven: a cardboard box, heavy duty aluminum foil, 4 empty cans, and duct tape. Read the post.

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  1. Best Banana Bread

In honor of National Banana Bread Day, here’s a simple banana bread recipe. You could make this in camp and bake it in a Dutch oven or in a box oven or you could make it at home and bring it to camp for a healthy snack. It works well as either muffins or a loaf. If you make a loaf, you could also slice it up and use it to make French toast for breakfast! Read the post.

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  1. Best Buttermilk Biscuits

This is the best buttermilk biscuit I’ve ever tasted. It’s light and fluffy and buttery. It tastes great with gravy on it or honey or jam or just plain butter or nothing at all. Making these biscuits have become a weekend tradition. My family has declared them to be better than the ones made by the Golden Arches or the Colonel. Read the post.

And the most-popular post of 2016 was …

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  1. Beef Stroganoff on a Camp Stove

This beef stroganoff recipe is a nod to my grandmother’s eastern European roots. This is one of my son’s favorite dishes and was the first recipe he asked me to teach him how to make. It is fast and easy, and I can usually have it on the table in less than 30 minutes. This would make a great Friday night dinner after rolling into camp because it is so quick. Read the post.

Keep those comments and suggestions coming! Now, let’s make 2017 even better and let’s get outside and get cooking!

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Categories: Cooking Outdoors | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Best Buttermilk Biscuits

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One of my culinary goals for 2016 is to up my biscuit/scone making game. Well, I have another winner to share with you. This is the best buttermilk biscuit I’ve ever tasted. It’s light and fluffy and buttery. It tastes great with gravy on it or honey or jam or just plain butter or nothing at all. Making these biscuits have become a weekend tradition. My family has declared them to be better than the ones made by the Golden Arches or the Colonel.

Yes, these biscuits are that good. Here are a few tricks that make them so good.

For light and fluffy biscuits, the butter needs to be really cold; so, I froze the butter and, using my cheese grater, I grated the butter. I placed the butter shavings in a container and put them back in the freezer. You could do this in camp with an ice-heavy cooler, or you could grate the butter ahead at home and then keep it in a really cold cooler or buried deep in the ice. By prepping my butter this way, when I add my butter to my dry ingredients, all it needs is a few turns of the pastry cutter and it’s mixed in. So it takes less muscle and time, and my butter stays colder.

The same goes for the buttermilk. It needs to be cold when you add it. Leave it in your cooler until you need it.

You could also premix your dry ingredients at home for easy prep in camp. I would recommend starting your coals and then, working very quickly, make your biscuits. By the time the biscuits are all cut and placed into the Dutch oven, your coals should be ready to go. If you prep your dry ingredients at home, remember to pack extra flour for flouring your board and working with the dough. A couple of cups ought to do.

Finally, when cutting your biscuits, use a straight down, straight up cutting motion. Do not twist because it seals the sides of the biscuits, which can prevent them from rising.

To cut out my biscuits, I used a 2½” cutter and I was able to make 9 biscuits, which works perfectly in my 12-inch Dutch oven. I placed 8 biscuits around the outside edge, one on each compass point, and 1 biscuit in the center.

Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven or baking sheet, medium-sized bowl, grater, pastry cutter, spatula, biscuit cutter, measuring cups and spoons.

Ingredients
6 tablespoons butter, grated and frozen
2 cups flour, plus extra for flouring your board and working with the dough
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup buttermilk, chilled
2-3 tablespoons butter, melted, for greasing the inside of the Dutch oven and for brushing onto the biscuits when they are done

Prep
In a chimney, start 33 coals or, at home, preheat your oven. Grease the inside of the Dutch oven.

In a medium-sized bowl, sift together your dry ingredients. Add the butter to the dry ingredients and cut in using a pastry cutter or a fork until it resembles course crumbs. Add the cold buttermilk and stir until dough is mixed and combined. I prefer to use a rubber spatula, but you could also use a fork or your hands. The dough will be slightly sticky.

Turn the dough onto a floured surface and pat into a rectangle, sprinkling with flour as needed to prevent it from sticking to your hands or the board. Fold the dough over and onto itself six times, so you end up with a tall square, then pat down to about 1 inch thick. I used a 2½” cutter to cut my biscuits. It is important that you push down to cut the dough and pull straight up (do not twist). Leftover dough can be combined and cut again, but no more than 1 or 2 times.

Place the biscuits in the Dutch oven or on a baking sheet, almost touching each other.

Bake in a 450°F oven, using 22 coals on the lid and 11 underneath, for 12-15 until browned. After the biscuits are baked, brush tops with melted butter.

Makes 9 biscuits

This post has been shared at Homestead Bloggers Network. If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, subscribe to Chuck Wagoneer by clicking on the Follow Us button in the upper right corner and follow us on Facebook and Pinterest for the latest updates and more stuff!

Categories: Dutch Oven, Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Apple Raisin Monkey Bread

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I think this just became my new favorite monkey bread! A couple weeks ago, we were going to a potluck brunch with friends and we wanted to make monkey bread. On a lark, we decided to add a diced apple and it was amazing! We loved it!

We used a Golden Delicious apple, but you could use whatever variety you like. We chose the Golden Delicious for its mild, sweet flavor. You could also use a Red Delicious, Gala, Fuji, any of the sweet varieties. You could even use a Granny Smith if you wanted a bit of tartness to counteract all the sweetness.

In addition to the raisins, the apple added a fresh and fruity component to the heavy sweet monkey bread. Apple and caramel are a classic pairing as are apple and raisin. It was a win all the way around.

So, in honor of National Sticky Bun Day Sunday, February 21, we just might have to make this one, again!

Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven or 12-cup Bundt pan.

Ingredients
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cans (16.3 oz each) refrigerated biscuits
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup raisins
1 cup apple, peeled and diced
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
3/4 cup butter or margarine, melted

Prep
Start 25 coals in a chimney or preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease the Dutch oven or Bundt pan with shortening or cooking spray. In large resealable plastic storage food bag, mix granulated sugar and cinnamon.

Separate dough into 16 biscuits; cut each into quarters. Add to bag, seal, and shake to coat. Arrange in pan, adding walnuts, raisins, and apple among the biscuit pieces.

In small bowl, mix brown sugar and butter; pour over biscuit pieces.

Bake at 350°F, using 17 coals on the lid and 8 underneath, for 28 to 32 minutes or until the top is golden brown and center is no longer doughy. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Turn upside down onto serving plate; pull apart to serve. Serve warm.

Serves 12.

 

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Categories: Breakfasts, Desserts, Dutch Oven, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Baking in the New Year

cheese_scone_IMG_1302_690pxWhat are your plans for upping your cooking game in 2016? Is there a specific dish you’d like to perfect? A technique you’d like to master? A culinary style you’d like to try?

This year, my cooking resolution is to master the art of scones or biscuits. For me, the terms are interchangeable. Because of our genealogy, our family is heavily influenced by England, Scotland, and Ireland. For my husband, that’s nearly all of his genetic makeup. For me, that’s nearly half with my other half being Scandinavian. So, we tend to call them scones.

There are two possible pronunciations of the word scone: the first rhymes with gone and the second rhymes with tone. In US English, the pronunciation rhyming with tone is more common. In British English, the two pronunciations traditionally have different regional and class associations, with the first pronunciation associated with the north of England and the northern working class, while the second is associated with the south and the middle class.

However you pronounce it, I feel a strong genetic tug to make scones, which I have ignored for far too long.

You have to admit that there’s just nothing like a fresh baked biscuit with breakfast or dinner, and what would biscuits and gravy be without biscuits? So, in the coming months, you can expect some scone recipes to appear in the blog. I hope that excites you as much as it excites me.

Scones or biscuits are a great way to get fresh bread into your camp menu. They are relatively easy to make without all the fuss of yeast bread. They can easily be made by hand, requiring no fancy equipment.

And, everyone loves a good biscuit. While a plain biscuit is hugely popular, you can also pack them with all kinds of goodies from cheeses to meats to fruits. Depending on what else you are serving, your scone can be savory or sweet.

I decided to start with a savory, cheese scone. This is a great recipe and you can subtly alter the flavor of the scone by the type of cheese you choose to use. From sharp Cheddar to Parmesan to Swiss to Gorgonzola, choose your favorite cheese and try making a scone with it. This would be a great scone to serve with breakfast or dinner. Can you imagine serving a hot and hearty stew with a warm, cheesy scone? Yum!

Equipment
Mixing bowl, clean work surface (cutting board, tabletop), pastry cutter, a fork for mixing, measuring cups and spoons, a Dutch oven or a box oven.

Ingredients
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1½ cups shredded Cheddar cheese (or cheese of your choice)
⅓ cup unsalted butter, chilled
⅓ cup milk
2 large eggs
1 egg yolk mixed with 1 teaspoon water for glaze (optional)

Prep
Preheat your oven or start your coals. Lightly butter the center of a baking sheet or the Dutch oven.

In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir in the cheese. Cut the butter into little cubes and distribute them over the flour mixture. With a pastry blender, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

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In a small bowl, stir together the milk and 2 eggs. Add the milk mixture to the flour mixture and stir until combined (a fork works well for this). At some point, the fork will become useless, so you might as well just pick it up with your hands and mush it together into a ball, sponging up all the little dry bits with the dough ball.

Shape into a disc with your hands, then spread the dough into an 8-inch diameter circle in the center of the prepared baking sheet or Dutch oven. (The first time I made them, I actually got a ruler and measured; now I just eyeball it using my hand.) If desired, brush the egg mixture over the top of the dough. Cut into 8 wedges.

Using a home oven, Dutch oven, or box oven, bake at 400°F for 15-17 minutes or until the top is lightly brown (emphasis on lightly), and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Try not to overcook it. If you overcook a scone, it dries out and starts to become a brick.

This post has been shared at Homestead Bloggers Network. If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, subscribe to Chuck Wagoneer by clicking on the Follow Us button in the upper right corner and follow us on Facebook and Pinterest for the latest updates and more stuff!

Categories: Dutch Oven, Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

London Broil Steak Cobbler

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One of our Assistant Scoutmasters is a true carnivore and it’s always a challenge to sneak vegetables into his meal. This recipe met that challenge and then some! While grocery shopping for the ingredients, my husband talked me into getting a beautiful London broil steak and I am so thankful he did. It was awesome! As I was prepping the London broil later that night, my knife sliced through it like butter, it was so tender!

I made this a few weeks ago at our annual skill building weekend for our younger scouts. I was feeding our adult and youth helpers who were there to teach and we had been working hard all day teaching knots, knives, fire, first-aid, cooking, etc. We were a hungry crew and this was a hearty, filling meal. This steak cobbler received rave reviews from both the scoutmasters and the boys!

 

Equipment

12-inch Dutch oven.

 

Ingredients

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

2+ pounds beef (top or bottom round, or London broil), cut into ½-inch chunks

4 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 medium onion, diced

8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced

1 (12 oz.) package frozen mixed vegetables (carrots, green beans, corn, peas), thawed

1 cup beef broth or consommé

½ teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon browning and seasoning sauce (Kitchen Bouquet, Gravy Master, etc.)

1 (12 oz.) container refrigerated buttermilk biscuits

 

Prep

At home, in a small container or plastic bag, combine flour, salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper. Cut the beef into ½-inch chunks. Dice the onions and slice the mushrooms. Store all of these separately for transport to camp.

In camp, in Dutch oven, preheated over 25 coals, warm 2 tablespoons oil. Add beef chunks to oven and cook until browned. Add remaining 2 tablespoons oil to the oven and add onions and mushrooms and cook until tender. Mix in the flour mixture until it resembles a paste and then add the beef broth followed by the browning sauce and frozen vegetables. Cook until heated through and meat sauce is slightly thickened. If you prefer a thicker sauce, add a little more flour.

Carefully set biscuits on top of meat sauce.

Bake in a 350°F oven, using 17 coals on the lid and 8 under the oven, for about 20 minutes or until biscuits are a golden brown. Serves 8-10.

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Categories: Dutch Oven, Main Dishes, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rib-Stickin’ Biscuits and Gravy

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Biscuits and gravy is just about the best breakfast comfort food there is. Warm, fluffy buttermilk biscuits smothered in thick, rich, creamy gravy. Mmm!

Here is a scrumptious gravy that is simple to make and guaranteed to stick to your ribs. The last time I made this in camp, I saw folks going back for thirds!

The biscuits can be baked in camp in a 16-inch Dutch oven or box oven or they can be baked at home or they can be store-bought.

I like to use country sausage because it has a maple flavor note, which contrasts nicely with the bite of the white and black peppers. And this is one of those times when I would NOT pre-cook the sausage because I don’t want to lose any of the drippings. I need everything in the skillet.

Adjust the peppers to your liking and be sure to use both white and black pepper as they each bring something to the party. The white pepper really adds some heat so be careful with that one.

Equipment

16-inch Dutch oven

Large skillet or a 12-inch Dutch oven

Stirring/serving spoon

Ingredients

2 (12 oz., 8 ct.) tubes of refrigerator buttermilk biscuits

1 pound ground sausage

1 cup crumbled bacon

¼ cup flour

4 cups milk

½ teaspoon white pepper

1 teaspoon pepper

¼ teaspoon salt

Prep Workbiscuits_in_16-inch_600w

Place biscuits side-by-side in preheated 16-inch Dutch oven. It’s a bit of a tight squeeze, but they all fit. Place 21 coals on the lid and 11 briquettes under the oven. Bake biscuits for about 15 minutes, until they become a golden brown.

While the biscuits bake, brown the sausage in a large skillet or 12-inch Dutch oven. Mix in the flour until it’s dissolved. Stir milk into the flour a little at a time until it’s all incorporated. Add white and black pepper and salt. Add in the crumbled bacon (I pre-cooked and crumbled the bacon at home). Simmer while stirring until gravy thickens and begins to bubble.

Serve gravy over opened biscuits. Serves 16. (Serves 8 if they want seconds!)

Categories: Breakfasts, Dutch Oven, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Pecan Sticky Bun Bits

pecan_sticky_bun_bitsThis recipe has become one of our favorites. It is super easy to make and has only 4 ingredients. From start to finish, you can have it on the camp table in just over an hour. It serves about 8 with each serving size being about 3 ounces or 1/3 of a cup. My family of 4 can easily demolish the whole batch!

These are so good you just can’t stop eating them. The bits of dough are covered in yummy caramel and the pecans add flavor and crunch. Be warned; however, these are a sugar rush and should be served with a well rounded breakfast that includes other items likes eggs, sausage or bacon, potatoes, etc. to help balance out the sugar load. They go well with milk, coffee or tea.

If you’re going to line your Dutch oven, I highly recommend using heavy duty foil. These are so sticky and gooey that the parchment liners just don’t hold up and end up tearing as you pull out the sticky bits.

 

Ingredients

24 ounces of refrigerator biscuit dough. (Container size varies depending on what brand and type you buy. I choose a hearty biscuit style rather than a more “delicate” style like croissants or crescent rolls.)

1 cup (2 standard sticks) butter

2 cups dark brown sugar

1 cup chopped pecans

 

Equipment

12-inch camp Dutch oven, cutting board, knife, 1 cup measuring cup, and something to stir with.

 

Prep Work

Start 25 briquettes.  In the 20 minutes or so that it will take these to be ready, you can pretty much get all the other prep work done. It goes faster if you have helpers.

Line your Dutch oven (optional). I use the wide heavy-duty foil.

Remove the biscuit dough from the containers and quarter each biscuit.

Once the coals are ready, warm the Dutch oven for a few minutes on all the coals.

In the pre-heated Dutch oven, melt the butter then stir in the brown sugar until well blended and it forms a nice smooth caramel sauce. If you don’t mix it well, then the brown sugar can be a little gritty.

Add the chopped pecans, mixing and coating them with the caramel sauce.

Add the dough bits and stir until all the pieces are coated with the caramel sauce.

Seat the lid and transfer 17 coals up to the lid, leaving 8 coals underneath. Bake 35 to 45 minutes or until biscuits are light golden brown, refreshing the coals as needed.

Categories: Breakfasts, Dutch Oven, Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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