Sides

Artisan Bread in Camp

There is something almost euphoric about the smell of fresh baked bread. When you smell it in camp it is downright magical.

This is a simple, rustic bread that goes together easy and requires no kneading. Yes, you read correctly, a yeast dough that requires no kneading. I used one of my 12-inch-deep Dutch ovens because I wanted the extra height. You could also use a regular 12-inch Dutch oven, but the top might get a little extra browned. You may have to adjust your coals.

Speaking of coals, I didn’t use the standard 2:1 ratio of coals (2 coals on the lid for every coal underneath). I wanted more heat coming from the top so the underside wouldn’t burn. I used a 3:1 ratio (3 coals on the lid for every coal underneath) and I think that is perfect.

This bread has a nice, crusty outside and the inside is soft and fluffy. At home, you could start it the night before and bake it for dinner the next day. In camp, you could start it in the morning and bake it for dinner that night. If you are making this at home in a conventional oven, bake it in a Dutch oven with the lid on for 30 minutes and then remove the lid and bake another 15 minutes to brown the outside.

Serve it warm, fresh out of the oven with some softened butter, and you’ll have some happy campers.

Equipment
12-inch-deep Dutch oven, mixing bowl, measuring cup and spoons, wooden spoon.

Ingredients
3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons kosher salt
½ teaspoon dry yeast (active dry or highly active dry work best; I used active dry)
1 ½ cups lukewarm water (110-115 degrees)
Extra flour for your board and hands

Prep
On your propane stove, gently warm some water to 110-115 degrees. If you overshoot, just remove from the heat and allow it to cool. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and yeast. Add the water and stir using a wooden spoon until the mixture forms a shaggy, but cohesive dough. You’ll know when you get there.

Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and store in a safe place protected from critters. Let the dough sit for 8-24 hours. The dough will bubble up and rise.

About an hour and a half before you want to eat the bread, start 40 coals (if you are using 12-inch Dutch oven and not a 12-inch-deep, adjust your coals down). Heat your Dutch oven to 450°F, using 30 coals on the lid and 10 underneath, for 30 minutes.

While your Dutch oven preheats, turn the dough onto a well-floured surface and, with floured hands, form the dough into a ball. Cover dough loosely with plastic wrap and let rest. Start a fresh batch of coals.

After the 30 minutes are up, with floured hands, place the bread dough into the preheated Dutch oven. I placed my bread dough onto a piece of parchment paper and then lowered the dough on the paper into the oven. Refresh the coals. Bake for 30-45 minutes or until crust is golden brown.

Remove the bread and place on a cutting board, letting it rest for about 5 minutes. Slice and serve!

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Mozzarella Stuffed Pizza Bombs

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These are so good. When we made these for the first time, they disappeared in about 5 minutes. They are best hot out of the oven while the cheese is still gooey. I’m not sure how they taste cold or reheated because they never last that long. Make sure you serve them with warm marinara sauce. They are a hit all by themselves, but dipping them in warm marinara knocks them out of the park!

These would make a great pre-dinner appetizer or as a side dish or as part of an evening cracker barrel. If you’re making these for an evening cracker barrel and want easy clean up, you could foil line your Dutch oven, but be sure to liberally grease the foil.

If you made enough of these, they could even be a main dish. To make them even more pizza-like you could wrap the mozzarella in a slice of pepperoni or Canadian bacon before wrapping them in the pizza dough. I just might have to try that.

They are a bit messy to make. Your hands end up covered in the butter-garlic mixture. I would have some hot soapy water standing by or use disposable food serving gloves.

You can make these using fresh oregano and garlic cloves or you can use dried minced garlic and dried oregano. I use dried oregano and dried, minced garlic and hand mix it.

I make a single batch in my 10-inch Dutch oven in camp or in my cast-iron skillet at home (it’s about the same size). I have not tried larger batches yet, but I imagine that if you doubled it, you could squeeze them into a 12-inch Dutch oven. They’d be cozy but it’s okay if they touch. If you do and it works, let me know.

I wonder how many I could squeeze into my 16-inch Dutch oven?! Hmmmm….

Equipment
10-inch Dutch oven or cast-iron skillet.

Ingredients
8 cloves of garlic, fresh, or 2 teaspoons dried, minced
1 tablespoon oregano, fresh, or 1 teaspoon dried
3 tablespoons melted unsalted butter
3 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon salt
9 ounces of pizza dough or 1 tube of refrigerated pizza dough
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
10 ounces of mozzarella, cut into ¾-inch cubes, or 8 mozzarella sticks, quartered
Extra olive oil and butter for greasing the Dutch oven or skillet
Marinara sauce for dipping, warmed

At home in a food processor, combine garlic cloves, oregano, melted butter, olive oil, and salt until well mixed. Load into a container for transport to camp in the cooler. You could do this in camp without the food processor by just mincing the garlic and herbs by hand or using dried, minced garlic and dried oregano.

In camp, using a mixture of olive oil and butter, liberally grease a Dutch oven (if making these at home, you could use a cast-iron skillet).

On a flat, floured surface, roll out the pizza dough into a 9-by-9-inch square that’s a ¼ inch thick. Brush with the melted garlic-butter mixture and sprinkle with red pepper flakes. Using a pizza cutter or sharp knife, cut the dough into 16 equal-sized squares. Place one piece of mozzarella or ½ of a stick (2 quartered pieces) into the middle of each piece of dough. Wrap the mozzarella up in the dough and seal the edges completely. In the Dutch oven or skillet, arrange all the balls, seam side down, so they’re touching. Brush each dough ball thoroughly with the garlic-butter mixture.

Bake in a 375°F oven, using 16 coals on the lid and 7 underneath, for about 20-25 minutes or until golden brown and puffed up. Serve with warm marinara sauce for dipping.

Serves about 5 as an appetizer, 3-4 as a main dish (because we can’t eat just 3 or 4)

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Categories: Dutch Oven, Main Dishes, Recipes, Sides, Snacks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Cran-Apple Coleslaw

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I grew up on a cranberry farm and, every once in a while, I get a craving for cranberries. I also like to find excuses to add cranberries wherever I can, so I couldn’t pass up an opportunity to enjoy them with apples.

This non-traditional coleslaw is perfect for when you’re looking for something a little different. The apples and cranberries are a classic pairing of sweetness and tartness. The almonds add just a bit of crunch along with the cabbage and carrots. And the dressing is both sweet and tangy, and brings it all together.

As the base for the dressing, I used Fage Greek yogurt for its richness and thickness. Whatever brand you choose, be sure it is Greek; otherwise, the yogurt will be too thin and your dressing will be too sloppy.

I’d recommend assembling and serving immediately to keep everything as crisp as possible. The dressing could be made ahead and brought to camp for when you’re ready to assemble.

As always, tweak it to your liking. If you’re not a fan of dried cranberries, you could substitute raisins. You could use a different variety of apple. We like gala apples.

I love the fruity freshness of this salad. You could easily pair it with most anything. Last weekend, we served it with our chipotle pulled pork and it was fantastic. Look for the chipotle pulled pork recipe soon!

Equipment
Large mixing bowl, small mixing bowl, whisk, knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons..

Ingredients
¾ cup Greek yogurt
¼ cup mayonnaise
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
6-7 cups cabbage, shredded (about 1 small cabbage)
1½ cups carrots, sliced into matchsticks
3 cups gala apples, sliced into matchsticks (about 2 apples)
½ cup green onions, sliced (about 4 stalks)
1 cup almonds, sliced or slivered
1 cup dried cranberries

Prep
At home or in camp, in a small mixing bowl, whisk together Greek yogurt, mayonnaise, honey, apple cider vinegar, and salt and pepper until smooth.

In a large bowl, toss together cabbage, carrots, apples, green onions, almonds and cranberries. Add the dressing and toss to evenly coat.

Serves about 8.

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Cheesy Spicy Hash Brown Casserole

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We love hash browns for breakfast either in a main dish like a big breakfast skillet or as a side dish. This hash brown casserole makes a great side dish and brings great flavor and a little heat. When I made this last weekend for the first time for a mixed group of scoutmasters and scouts, I seeded my chiles because I was concerned that I might overwhelm some of the younger taste buds. The heat was very mild. If you really want to bring the heat, then leave the seeds in. You could also swap out some of the chilies for hotter varieties. My son tried to talk me into using a ghost pepper. I said no. I opted for Monterey Jack cheese but, again, if you want to bring the heat, you could step it up to Pepper Jack cheese. I used frozen southern style hash browns, but you could just as easily peel and dice fresh potatoes.

First thing in the morning, after I get my coffee, I’d start this one. It has about 30 minutes of prep (less if you chop your veggies and grate your cheese at home before you go) and then about 30 minutes of baking time. After 30 minutes, the potatoes were cooked through but you’ll notice in the picture below that they look a little pale. Next time I might let them brown a little in the Dutch oven before I put the lid on and add coals. After I put the lid on and add coals, I also might let them go longer than 30 minutes just to see if I can get a little more color on the potatoes.

I’d recommend a 12-inch or larger Dutch oven or 9×13 deep baking dish for a full batch. If you want to do a half batch, I’d step down to a 10-inch or 12-inch Dutch oven or an 8×8 baking dish. Remember to adjust your coals for the size of your Dutch oven. Here’s a link to my Dutch Oven Size Chart and Temperature Guide.

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Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven, cutting board, chef knife, cheese grater, stirring/serving spoon.

Ingredients
8 slices bacon, fried and chopped
2 tablespoons butter
2 large green chiles, diced
2 jalapenos, finely diced
1 poblano chile, diced
1 yellow onion, diced
4 pounds (2 bags) frozen southern style hash browns (diced potatoes)
Salt and ground pepper
2 cups grated sharp Cheddar
2 cups grated Monterey Jack or Pepper Jack

Prep
Dice the vegetables and grate the cheese. On a campfire, a bed of coals, or on a propane stove, fry the bacon in the Dutch oven until its nice and crispy. While the bacon is frying, load 27 coals into a chimney with 1-2 fire starters and, when the bacon is done, light your coals. Remove the bacon from the Dutch oven and set aside on a paper towel. You may want to critter and camper proof it or it just might disappear! I’ve had a number of scouts learn that lesson the hard way!

To the Dutch oven, add the butter and then add the chiles and onion, and sauté until well browned. Pour in the frozen hash browns and add some salt and pepper. Be generous with the salt; that’s a lot of potatoes. Toss everything together. Let it heat up for just a few minutes to steam off any excess liquid from the hash browns; you can crumble or chop the bacon while you wait.

Sprinkle on the cheese and top with crumbled bacon. Put the lid on and move it to coals.

Bake at 375°F, using 18 coals on the lid and 9 underneath, for about 30 minutes until hot and bubbly or until the potatoes are done to your liking.

Makes about 20 4-ounce (½-cup) servings or 10 8-ounce (1 cup) servings. And, c’mon, let’s be real. We’re all going to take a 1 cup serving and go back for seconds…. Just sayin’….

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Categories: Breakfasts, Dutch Oven, Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Best Buttermilk Biscuits

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One of my culinary goals for 2016 is to up my biscuit/scone making game. Well, I have another winner to share with you. This is the best buttermilk biscuit I’ve ever tasted. It’s light and fluffy and buttery. It tastes great with gravy on it or honey or jam or just plain butter or nothing at all. Making these biscuits have become a weekend tradition. My family has declared them to be better than the ones made by the Golden Arches or the Colonel.

Yes, these biscuits are that good. Here are a few tricks that make them so good.

For light and fluffy biscuits, the butter needs to be really cold; so, I froze the butter and, using my cheese grater, I grated the butter. I placed the butter shavings in a container and put them back in the freezer. You could do this in camp with an ice-heavy cooler, or you could grate the butter ahead at home and then keep it in a really cold cooler or buried deep in the ice. By prepping my butter this way, when I add my butter to my dry ingredients, all it needs is a few turns of the pastry cutter and it’s mixed in. So it takes less muscle and time, and my butter stays colder.

The same goes for the buttermilk. It needs to be cold when you add it. Leave it in your cooler until you need it.

You could also premix your dry ingredients at home for easy prep in camp. I would recommend starting your coals and then, working very quickly, make your biscuits. By the time the biscuits are all cut and placed into the Dutch oven, your coals should be ready to go. If you prep your dry ingredients at home, remember to pack extra flour for flouring your board and working with the dough. A couple of cups ought to do.

Finally, when cutting your biscuits, use a straight down, straight up cutting motion. Do not twist because it seals the sides of the biscuits, which can prevent them from rising.

To cut out my biscuits, I used a 2½” cutter and I was able to make 9 biscuits, which works perfectly in my 12-inch Dutch oven. I placed 8 biscuits around the outside edge, one on each compass point, and 1 biscuit in the center.

Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven or baking sheet, medium-sized bowl, grater, pastry cutter, spatula, biscuit cutter, measuring cups and spoons.

Ingredients
6 tablespoons butter, grated and frozen
2 cups flour, plus extra for flouring your board and working with the dough
1 tablespoon sugar
¼ teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup buttermilk, chilled
2-3 tablespoons butter, melted, for greasing the inside of the Dutch oven and for brushing onto the biscuits when they are done

Prep
In a chimney, start 33 coals or, at home, preheat your oven. Grease the inside of the Dutch oven.

In a medium-sized bowl, sift together your dry ingredients. Add the butter to the dry ingredients and cut in using a pastry cutter or a fork until it resembles course crumbs. Add the cold buttermilk and stir until dough is mixed and combined. I prefer to use a rubber spatula, but you could also use a fork or your hands. The dough will be slightly sticky.

Turn the dough onto a floured surface and pat into a rectangle, sprinkling with flour as needed to prevent it from sticking to your hands or the board. Fold the dough over and onto itself six times, so you end up with a tall square, then pat down to about 1 inch thick. I used a 2½” cutter to cut my biscuits. It is important that you push down to cut the dough and pull straight up (do not twist). Leftover dough can be combined and cut again, but no more than 1 or 2 times.

Place the biscuits in the Dutch oven or on a baking sheet, almost touching each other.

Bake in a 450°F oven, using 22 coals on the lid and 11 underneath, for 12-15 until browned. After the biscuits are baked, brush tops with melted butter.

Makes 9 biscuits

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Best Banana Bread

blues_banana_bread_IMG_1450_690pxIn honor of National Banana Bread Day, here’s a simple banana bread recipe. You could make this in camp and bake it in a Dutch oven or in a box oven or you could make it at home and bring it to camp for a healthy snack. It works well as either muffins or a loaf. If you make a loaf, you could also slice it up and use it to make French toast for breakfast!

This is an easy recipe with just a few ingredients. We’ve been making this banana bread for many years, I hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

Ingredients
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 ripe bananas, mashed

Prep
Sift and measure flour. Resift with soda and salt. Cream butter and sugar. Add beaten eggs and vanilla to creamed mixture. Add flour mixture and beat thoroughly. Mix in Bananas. Pour into well-greased pan and bake at 350°F for 1 hour. For muffins, bake for 18 minutes.

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Scalloped Potatoes are the Mother of All Comfort Foods

 

meatloaf_scalloped_potatoes_IMG_1221_690pxScalloped potatoes are one of my family’s favorite winter comfort foods. They pair very nicely with my meatloaf. They both cook at the same temperature. The potatoes go into the oven first because they cook 90 minutes and then I assemble the meatloaf and it goes into the oven for an hour. I time it so they are done at the same time. I serve them together with either a green vegetable or a salad. It’s heaven on a plate!

For the meatloaf recipe, please see my blog post: “Best Ever Meatloaf.”

I can’t even begin to tell you how old this scalloped potatoes recipe is. I know it dates back to at least my grandmother and hasn’t really changed at all over the years. I use black pepper in the béchamel (white sauce) and, technically, you should use white pepper, but this is the way my mother and grandmother made it and that’s how I make it. Feel free to try it both ways and use whichever you like best.

I think scalloped potatoes are the comfort food of all comfort foods. It’s a savory dish with just a little sweetness from the creamy white sauce. The top gets brown and just a little crusty. It’s smooth and creamy. I could probably go on for days!

For last fall’s pioneering weekend, I really wanted some comfort foods because the weather was going to be cold and rainy. I was also curious about how the scalloped potatoes would perform in a Dutch oven and they did not disappoint.

I made them a little differently in camp. At home, I make the béchamel on the stove top. In a 2-quart casserole dish, I build 2-3 layers of potatoes, sauce, parsley, and bits of butter. In camp, I wanted to make this as a one-pot dish so I actually made the béchamel in the Dutch oven and then dumped in the potatoes and pushed them down into the sauce. It worked!

Below is the camp version, but you could easily adapt it back into your home kitchen if you wanted to.

Equipment
12-inch Dutch oven, cutting board, knife, measuring spoons and cups.

Ingredients
6 tablespoons butter
6 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
3 cups whole milk or heavy cream
4 cups of potatoes, peeled and sliced (about 1/8-inch ish thick)
¼ cup parsley, dried or fresh, chopped (this measurement is just a guess on my part because I just eyeball it)
1-3 tablespoons extra butter, cubed, for dotting onto the top

Prep
Peal and slice the potatoes. I slice mine pretty thin (about 1/8-inch ish thick). You could do this at home and load them into a resealable bag. Start 21 coals. In the Dutch oven, using coals or a camp stove, melt the butter over low heat. Blend in the flour, salt, and pepper. Cook over low heat, stirring until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Remove from heat. Stir in milk or cream. Return to heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil gently until sauce becomes smooth and creamy. Stir in a generous amount of chopped or dried parsley. Drop in the sliced potatoes and push down into the sauce until they are all covered. Dot the top with the extra butter. Bake at 350°F, using 14 coals on the lid and 7 underneath, for 90 minutes. Refresh coals as needed.

Makes 6-8 servings.

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Baking in the New Year

cheese_scone_IMG_1302_690pxWhat are your plans for upping your cooking game in 2016? Is there a specific dish you’d like to perfect? A technique you’d like to master? A culinary style you’d like to try?

This year, my cooking resolution is to master the art of scones or biscuits. For me, the terms are interchangeable. Because of our genealogy, our family is heavily influenced by England, Scotland, and Ireland. For my husband, that’s nearly all of his genetic makeup. For me, that’s nearly half with my other half being Scandinavian. So, we tend to call them scones.

There are two possible pronunciations of the word scone: the first rhymes with gone and the second rhymes with tone. In US English, the pronunciation rhyming with tone is more common. In British English, the two pronunciations traditionally have different regional and class associations, with the first pronunciation associated with the north of England and the northern working class, while the second is associated with the south and the middle class.

However you pronounce it, I feel a strong genetic tug to make scones, which I have ignored for far too long.

You have to admit that there’s just nothing like a fresh baked biscuit with breakfast or dinner, and what would biscuits and gravy be without biscuits? So, in the coming months, you can expect some scone recipes to appear in the blog. I hope that excites you as much as it excites me.

Scones or biscuits are a great way to get fresh bread into your camp menu. They are relatively easy to make without all the fuss of yeast bread. They can easily be made by hand, requiring no fancy equipment.

And, everyone loves a good biscuit. While a plain biscuit is hugely popular, you can also pack them with all kinds of goodies from cheeses to meats to fruits. Depending on what else you are serving, your scone can be savory or sweet.

I decided to start with a savory, cheese scone. This is a great recipe and you can subtly alter the flavor of the scone by the type of cheese you choose to use. From sharp Cheddar to Parmesan to Swiss to Gorgonzola, choose your favorite cheese and try making a scone with it. This would be a great scone to serve with breakfast or dinner. Can you imagine serving a hot and hearty stew with a warm, cheesy scone? Yum!

Equipment
Mixing bowl, clean work surface (cutting board, tabletop), pastry cutter, a fork for mixing, measuring cups and spoons, a Dutch oven or a box oven.

Ingredients
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1½ cups shredded Cheddar cheese (or cheese of your choice)
⅓ cup unsalted butter, chilled
⅓ cup milk
2 large eggs
1 egg yolk mixed with 1 teaspoon water for glaze (optional)

Prep
Preheat your oven or start your coals. Lightly butter the center of a baking sheet or the Dutch oven.

In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Stir in the cheese. Cut the butter into little cubes and distribute them over the flour mixture. With a pastry blender, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

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In a small bowl, stir together the milk and 2 eggs. Add the milk mixture to the flour mixture and stir until combined (a fork works well for this). At some point, the fork will become useless, so you might as well just pick it up with your hands and mush it together into a ball, sponging up all the little dry bits with the dough ball.

Shape into a disc with your hands, then spread the dough into an 8-inch diameter circle in the center of the prepared baking sheet or Dutch oven. (The first time I made them, I actually got a ruler and measured; now I just eyeball it using my hand.) If desired, brush the egg mixture over the top of the dough. Cut into 8 wedges.

Using a home oven, Dutch oven, or box oven, bake at 400°F for 15-17 minutes or until the top is lightly brown (emphasis on lightly), and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Try not to overcook it. If you overcook a scone, it dries out and starts to become a brick.

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Raspberry Vinaigrette is Sweet and Tangy

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I admit, store-bought dressings are a convenience but have you ever stopped and read the labels? They are loaded with all kinds of unnecessary ingredients and some of them are allergens. Cooking for others can sometimes mean cooking for allergies so I’m always on the lookout for ways I can cook from scratch so I can control what all the ingredients are. This recipe only has 3 ingredients and you could choose to make it with fresh or frozen raspberries or you could use raspberry jam and, if it’s homemade raspberry jam, all the better.

I love this raspberry vinaigrette because it has great flavor and is so simple to make. It’s sweet and tangy and tends to be well received by kids who tend not to be big salad eaters.

Equipment
Blender or mixing bowl and whisk, measuring cups

Ingredients
¼ cup olive oil
1 cup seasoned rice vinegar
10 ounces of seedless raspberry jam or fresh or frozen raspberries, mashed

Prep
Dump everything into the blender or bowl and blend or whisk until smooth and store in the refrigerator. Serve over greens. I like to add chopped nuts and a little feta cheese to contrast with the sweet and tangy dressing.

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Three-Apple Salad is Sweet and Savory

3_Apple_Salad_IMG_0865_600pxI absolutely love this salad and I’m not a big salad fan so that’s saying a lot. We made it just a couple weeks ago while teaching outdoor cooking to a group of Girl Scout adult volunteers. We served it with a hearty, spicy potato chowder and it was the perfect side dish. The salad was light, tart, sweet and savory. It was like a little party in your mouth.

I love the different colors and flavors of the apples. We used a sweet red Gala, a yellow Golden Delicious, and a tart green Granny Smith. Instead of the Gala, you could use a Fuji. Of the variations below, we used cheddar cheese (I chose sharp for its bold flavor), dried cherries, and crunchy walnuts. Instead of the frozen apple juice concentrate, we used regular apple juice. The dressing is creamy and tangy and doesn’t overpower the other ingredients. The green onion adds just a little bite.

This recipe has great flavors and is very kid friendly. It’s just yummy!

To prep at home, you could mix the dressing, toast the nuts (which I forgot to do) and even dice the cheese and celery and slice the green onions. I would dice the apples in camp right before assembly. Because we were teaching, we had our “students” prep everything in camp and it didn’t take long at all. Below is a picture of everything in the bowl before we added the dressing. This is a double batch. Isn’t it pretty?!

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Because of its light and fresh flavors and the cooling properties of the dressing, this salad would pair perfectly with anything that is heavy and/or spicy.

 

Equipment

Medium-size mixing bowl, small-size mixing bowl, knife, cutting board, measuring cups and spoons, rubber spatula.

 

Ingredients

3 apples (1 red, 1 yellow, 1 green) diced (½-inch) to measure 2 cups

3 ounces Swiss, Cheddar or Gouda cheese, diced ½-inch to measure ¾ cup

½ cup celery, diced (½-inch)

½ cup dried cherries or cranberries

1 tablespoon green onion, thinly sliced

¼ cup walnuts or pecans, toasted and chopped (optional)

½ cup plain fat-free yogurt

¼ cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon frozen apple juice concentrate or straight apple juice

1 teaspoon lemon juice

 

Prep

In medium bowl, combine apples, cheese, celery, cherries, green onion and nuts.

For dressing, in small bowl stir together yogurt, mayonnaise, apple juice concentrate and the lemon juice. Toss gently with salad. Serve on lettuce leaves if desired.

Serves 8 as a side dish.

To toast nuts, spread nuts on baking sheet and bake in a 325°F oven for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring twice, until nuts are fragrant and lightly browned. If you want to toast these in camp, you could use a box oven with 13 briquettes or a Dutch oven. To determine the number of coals needed for the size of your Dutch oven, reference the Dutch Oven Temperature Chart on the Soup to Nuts page.

 

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Categories: Recipes, Sides | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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